December 2013

FEHA Extends to Military and Veterans

Humboldt County employers should know that the California Fair Employment and Housing Act (“FEHA”) now extends its protections from employment discrimination to those with “military and veteran” status.  Beginning January 1, 2014, such status is defined as "a member or veteran of the United States Armed Forces, United States Armed Forces Reserve, the United States National Guard, and the California National Guard."  Employers may still, however, inquire into military or veteran status, but only for awarding veteran preference where allowed by law.

Tags: 

Restitution for Humboldt County Crime Victims

Persons who have been harmed by criminal conduct often find that the prosecutor is appropriately focused on obtaining a conviction, but has less time to address the harms suffered by the victim.  Although the courts routinely reserve the right for victims to seek restitution, a victim oftentimes finds that they do not have the time or resources to ensure that they actually get back before the court to obtain a restitution order.It is important to know that as a victim of criminal conduct in Humboldt County you have a right to have your own lawyer present with you in court and to have that l

Tags: 

Live Streaming Comes to the Court of Appeals

The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit announced that live video streaming would be available for upcoming en banc cases scheduled to be argued on December 9-11, 2013.  This session of the Court took place at the James R. Browning U.S. Courthouse in San Francisco. The Ninth Circuit has made the the video recordings available for the public to view at the Court’s website.

Tags: 

A Sobering Look at Employer Liability

Any Humboldt County employer knows that a holiday party is fraught with the possibility of bad behavior—particularly when alcohol is added to the mix. Employers may now be liable, however, when employees injure others after non-required events at which an employer serves alcohol—such as holiday parties. In 2009, a Southern California employer held a holiday party at which it served alcohol. One of the employer’s employees, with a blood alcohol level above the legal limit, drove home and arrived safely, but then decided to drive another co-worker home.

Tags: